Children lose trust in a consensus composed of outgroup members

Children prefer to learn from informants in consensus with one another. However, no research has examined whether this preference exists across cultures, and whether the race of the informants impacts that preference. In 2 studies, one hundred thirty-six 4- to 7-year-old European American and Taiwanese children demonstrated a systematic preference for a consensus. Kathleen Corriveau is an Associate Professor in Human Development. Her research focuses on social and cognitive development in childhood, with a specific focus on how children decide what people and what information are trustworthy sources. She is also interested in language and reading development, cross-cultural differences and the role of parenting in children’s social and emotional development.

Image courtesy of interviewee. November 28, 2016

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