Complexity and the Characterisation of Learning

Complexity theory offers an alternative to the simple causality and reductive accounts of change which dominate contemporary policy and practice. It does so by recognising that the interplay of dynamic elements results in the emergence of patterns and meanings that cannot be predicted by considering those elements in isolation. Mark Hardman has been involved in and led a broad range of teacher education programmes across London and the South East, supporting undergraduate, postgraduate and postdoctoral student teachers as well as experienced teachers.

Publication

Image courtesy of interviewee

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