The political economy of religion in the early Roman empire.

Cities in the ancient world extracted a great deal of wealth from their hinterlands and often claimed a monopoly on fiscal authority and jurisdiction within their territories. Clifford Ando explores the source, nature and limits of the social and fiscal power exercised by cities over villages in their hinterlands. Clifford Ando’s research focuses on the history of religion, law and government in the ancient world.  His first work centered on the history of political culture in the provinces of the Roman empire, and he continues to write and advise on topics related to provincial administration, the relationship between imperial power and local cultural change, and the form and structure of ancient empires.

Image courtesy of interviewee

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