Co-operation, Leadership and Learning

In the early twentieth century, the consumer co-operative movement in Britain was a major social force with a membership of three million at the outbreak of the First World War. The gradual emergence of the Co-operative College after 1919 represented an attempt to provide higher education as well as structure for the wide array of educational activities that were organised by the movement.

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