Legalising assisted dying: cross purposes and unintended consequences

In the UK, assisted dying continues to be unlawful, and pro-legalization campaigners have made use of human rights based applications for judicial review and Private Members Bills in order to try to change the law. Interestingly, however, the proposed statute would not offer an assisted death to many of the litigants who have sought to force Parliament’s hand. Emily Jackson considers whether this a one-off peculiarity, or whether there might be other mismatches between what the law can achieve and what matters most to people who are seeking an assisted death for themselves. It also explores what seems to be a common feature of debates over assisted dying, namely the tendency for one problem to be solved, while another is created.

 

 

Publication

Image courtesy of interviewee

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