How does moving house affect young children?

Children move home in their early years more often than they do once they start school. This transatlantic research project looked at two cohorts of children born around the year 2000, focusing on the first five years of life, rather than often-researched school ages, to examine the impact solely of moving home rather than the complications that arise when moving and changing school.  Heather Joshi is Emeritus Professor of Economic and Developmental Demography at the Centre for Longitudinal Studies. She was previously the Director of the Centre for Longitudinal Studies from 2003 to 2010, and its Deputy Director from 1994. She was PI and Director of the UK Millennium Cohort Study from 2000 – 2011. Heather is an economic demographer who has used a number of longitudinal datasets including the ONS LS. Her research has been mainly concerned with the family, the labour market, gender, child development, child mental health. and spatial issues. She was Co-Chair of the European Child Cohort Network fostering international collaboration and comparison between cohort studies and the founder President of the Society for Longitudinal and Lifecourse Studies.  In 2016 she providing support to the maternity leave cover for the current Principal Investigator of the Millennium Cohort Study. Heather is a Fellow of the British Academy,  and of the Academy of Social Sciences. She was awarded an OBE in 2002 for services to Women’s Studies and a CBE in 2015 for services to Longitudinal Studies and Women’s Studies.

Find out More here

Report Infringement

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Previous Article

The South and disarmament at the UN

Next Article

The influence of grandparents' social class on children's aspirations

×
As a Guest, you have insight(s) remaining for this month. Create a free account to view 300 more annually.
Related Posts
error:

Add the Faculti Web App to your Mobile or Desktop homescreen

Install
×